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patient discussing vaginal symptoms with healthcare professional
patient discussing vaginal symptoms with healthcare professional
patient discussing vaginal symptoms with healthcare professional
patient discussing vaginal symptoms with healthcare professional


Prevalence


BV affects over 21 million women in the U.S. each year1

woman struggling with vaginal odor from bacterial vaginosis

BV affects over 21 million women in the U.S. each year1


Demographic Prevalence


Approximately 30% of American women are affected by BV1


African American and Mexican American women are at a higher risk2:

african american versus mexican american bacterial vaginosis prevalence bar graph

4 million women are treated for bacterial vaginosis (BV) each year3



Treatment and Nonadherence


It's estimated that only 50% of BV patients complete 5 to 7-day treatments4,5

According to a national survey of HCPs who treat BV, reasons for patient nonadherence include6*:



Perspectives on Oral Noncompliance6*

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56%

believe that patients

forgot to take their treatment

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54%

believe that patients

wanted to drink alcohol





Perspectives on Intravaginal Noncompliance6*

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71%

believe that patients have

have discontinued treatment because of messiness

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45%

believe that patients wanted to have

vaginal intercourse





* The Harris Poll was conducted on behalf of Symbiomix Therapeutics, LLC, a Lupin Company, and the American Sexual Health Association (ASHA) among patients with BV and HCPs who treat BV within the U.S. (150 OB/GYNs, 151 board-certified nurse practitioners in women's health, and OB/GYN physicians who see an average of 20+ BV patients a month) on March 1-15, 2018.6







Risk Factors



Risk factors for BV include:

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Douching1

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A Higher Number of Lifetime Sexual Partners1

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Overweight or Obese Body Mass Index (BMI)7

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Being Sexually Active1

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Same-Sex Sexual Activity1

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Smoking1

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No condom use8

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Having been pregnant in the past1

BV Sequelae



Untreated BV is associated with a range of potentially serious consequences8

nurse checking heart beat of patient in hospital

Untreated BV is associated with a range of potentially serious consequences8


  • Increased risk of acquisition of some STIs, such as HIV, C. trachomatis, N. gonorrhoeae, and HSV-2
  • Increased risk of HIV transmission to a male sex partner
  • Complications after gynecologic surgery
  • Pelvic inflammatory disease (PID), which may endanger fertility

References:

  1. Koumans EH, Sternberg M, Bruce C, et al. The prevalence of bacterial vaginosis in the United States, 2001-2004; associations with symptoms, sexual behaviors, and reproductive health. Sex Transm Dis. 2007;34(11):864-869.
  2. Allsworth JE, Lewis VA, Peipert JF. Viral sexually transmitted infections and bacterial vaginosis: 2001-2004 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey data. Sex Transm Dis. 2008;35(9):791-796.
  3. Chavoustie SE, Eder SE, Koltun WD, et al. Experts explore the state of bacterial vaginosis and the unmet needs facing women and providers. Int J Gynaecol Obstet. 2017;137(2):107-109.
  4. Bartley JB, Ferris DG, Allmond LM, Dickman ED, Dias JK, Lambert J. Personal digital assistants used to document compliance of bacterial vaginosis treatment. Sex Transm Dis. 2004;31(8):488-491.
  5. Schwebke JR, Morgan FG Jr, Koltun W, Nyirjesy P. A phase-3, double-blind, placebo-controlled study of the effectiveness and safety of single oral doses of secnidazole 2 g for the treatment of women with bacterial vaginosis [published correction appears in Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2018;219(1):110]. Int J Gynaecol Obstet. 2017;217(6):678.e1-678.e9. doi: 10.1016/j.ajog.2017.08.017.
  6. Data on file. Bacterial Vaginosis Physician Survey. Symbiomix Therapeutics, LLC, a Lupin Company, and the American Sexual Health Association (ASHA). Prepared March 2018.
  7. Brookheart RT, Lewis WG, Peipert JF, Lewis AL, Allsworth JE. Association between obesity and bacterial vaginosis as assessed by Nugent Score. Int J Gynaecol Obstet. 2019;220(5):476.e1-476.e11.
  8. Workowski KA, Bolan GA; CDC. Sexually Transmitted Diseases Treatment Guidelines, 2015 [published correction appears in MMWR Recomm Rep. 2015;64(33):924]. MMWR Recomm Rep. 2015;64(RR-03):1-137.