The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) include SOLOSEC in their guidelines for the treatment of BV2,3
Current CDC and ACOG listed oral treatments for BV2,3:
  • 500 mg oral metronidazole 2x daily for 7 days
  • Tinidazole 2 g x 2 days or 1 g x 5 days
  • Clindamycin 300 mg orally 2x daily for 7 days
  • Secnidazole 2 g single oral dose
SOLOSEC is the only single dose oral antibiotic indicated to treat BV1
Recurrent vaginal discharge could be a symptom of unidentified or inadequately treated bacterial vaginosis (BV)2
  • Non-compliance to a multiple-day metronidazole regimen is a contributing factor to persistent BV.4
  • As many as 50% of patients do NOT complete a full 7-day course of metronidazole.7
  • Non-compliance to a multiple-day metronidazole regimen is a contributing factor to persistent BV.4
  • As many as 50% of patients do NOT complete a full 7-day course of metronidazole.7
Inadequately treated BV can affect more than just your patient
BV is associated with adverse feto-maternal outcomes2:
  • Increased risk of infertility8
  • Increased risk of preclinical pregnancy loss8
  • Pre-term birth, premature rupture of membranes, low birth weight, chorioamnionitis, and spontaneous abortion9,10
  • Preterm labor (BV detected in 24% of women with pre-term labor in a 2012 study)11

SOLOSEC has no pregnancy restrictions.1*
* Available data on pregnancy are limited to animal studies.
Metronidazole and tinidazole are contraindicated in the first trimester of pregnancy.12,13
Metronidazole and tinidazole are contraindicated in the first trimester of pregnancy.12,13
Maternal BV was associated with increased risk among preterm infants14:
24%
increased risk for admission to NICU
Maternal BV was associated with increased risk among preterm infants14:
28%
increased risk of assisted ventilation at birth
42%
increased risk for admission to NICU
60%
increased risk for neonatal sepsis
Metronidazole and tinidazole are contraindicated in the first trimester of pregnancy.12,13
BV is associated with increased risk of other infections and complications2
2.5x
risk for pelvic inflammatory disease (PID)15
3.0x
risk for postprocedural gynecological infections16
3.2x
risk for post-hysterectomy cuff cellulitis if co-infected with trichomoniasis17
2.4x
higher risk to be co-infected with trichomoniasis18
Increased risk of acquisition of gonorrhea, chlamydia, HPV, and HSV19
Increased risk of acquisition and transmission of HIV20
In the patient's voice:

My BV was taken care of with that one little packet. One packet, one time, and I was done with my treatment.

Lashera, actual SOLOSEC patient*
*Quote from an actual SOLOSEC patient who was compensated for her services and time. Individual results may vary.

If I give a patient a multiday antibiotic, there's a real risk that they may stop taking the treatment early if they start feeling better before the end of it.

Steven Chavoustie MD, FACOG, CCRP
Quote from a medical doctor who was compensated for his services and time.

The first thing I noticed was the fishy odor. When I saw discharge, I knew I had to go to my doctor.

In my practice, I would say I treat about 60-75 patients with BV a month.

SOLOSEC is the only single dose oral antibiotic that provides a complete course of therapy to treat BV.
SOLOSEC is the only single dose oral antibiotic that provides a complete course of therapy to treat both BV and trichomoniasis.1
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References:
References: 1. SOLOSEC [prescribing information]. Baltimore, MD: Lupin Pharmaceuticals, Inc; 2021. 2. Workowski KA, Bachmann LH, Chan PA, et al. CDC Sexually Transmitted Diseases Treatment Guidelines, 2021. MMWR Recomm Rep 2021;70(RR-04):1-192. 3. American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. ACOG Practice Bulletin: Clinical Management Guidelines for Obstetricians-Gynecologists, Number 215. Obstet Gynecol 2020:135(1):e1-e17. 4. Marrazzo JM, Thomas KK, Fledler TL, Ringwood K, Fredricks DN. Relationship of Specific Vaginal Bacteria and Bacterial Vaginosis Treatment Failure in Women Who Have Sex with Women. Ann Intern Med 2008;149:20-28. 5. Hillier SL, Austin M, Macio I, et al. Diagnosis and Treatment of Vaginal Discharge Syndromes in Community Practice Settings. Clin Infect Dis 2020:1-6. 6. Bradshaw CS, Morton AN, Hocking J, et al. High recurrence rates of bacterial vaginosis over the course of 12 months after oral metronidazole therapy and factors associated with recurrence. J Infect Dis 2006; 193:1478–89. 7. Bartley JB, Ferris DG, Allmond LM, Dickman ED, Dias JK, Lambert J. Personal digital assistants used to document compliance of bacterial vaginosis treatment. Sex Transm Dis 2004;31(8):488-491.23. 8. Ravel J, Moreno I, Simon C. Bacterial vaginosis and its association with infertility, endometritis, and pelvic inflammatory disease. Am J Obstet Gynecol 2021;224(3):251-257. 9. Leitich H, Bodner-Adler B, Brunbauer M, et al. Bacterial vaginosis as a risk factor for preterm delivery: a meta-analysis Am J Obstet Gynecol 2003;189(1):139-147. 10. Svare JA, Schmidt H, Hansen BB, Lose G. Bacterial vaginosis in a cohort of Danish pregnant women: prevalence and relationship with preterm delivery, low birthweight and perinatal infections BJOG 2006;113(12):1419-1425. 11. Laxmi U, Agrawal S, Raghunandan C, Randhawa VS, Saili A. Association of bacterial vaginosis with adverse fetomaternal outcome in women with spontaneous preterm labor: a prospective cohort study. J Matern-Fetal Neonatal Med 2011;25(1):64-67. 12. Flagyl [prescribing information]. New York, NY: Pfizer; 2021. 13. Tinidazole Tablets [prescribing information]. Buffalo Grove, IL: G.D. PACK Pharmaceuticals, LLC; 2018. 14. Dingens, AS, Fairfortune, TS, Reed, S et al. Bacterial vaginosis and adverse outcomes among full-term infants: a cohort study. BMC Pregnancy Childbirth 2016;278(16):1-8. 15. Smart S, Singal A, Mindel A. Social and sexual risk factors for bacterial vaginosis. Sex Transm Infect 2004;80:58-62. 16. Soper DE, Bump RC, Hurt WG. Bacterial vaginosis and trichomoniasis vaginitis are risk factors for cuff cellulitis after abdominal hysterectomy. Am J Obstet Gynecol 1990;163(3):1016-1021. 17. Persson E, Bergstrom M, Larsson PG et al. Infections after hysterectomy. A prospective nation-wide Swedish study. Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand 1996;75(8):757-761. 18. Balkus JE, Richardson BA, Rabe LK, et al. Bacterial vaginosis and the risk of Trichomonas vaginalis acquisition among HIV-1 negative women. Sex Trans Dis 2014;41(2):123-128. 19. Chavoustie SE, Maribona AS, Hanna M. Bacterial Vaginosis and the Risk for Sexually Transmitted Infections. Contemp Ob Gyn 2020. Educational Supplement. 20. Thurman AR, Kimble t, Herold B et al. Bacterial Vaginosis and Subclinical Markers of Genital Tract Inflammation and Mucosal Immunity. Aids Res Hum Retrovir 2015;31(11):1139-1152.